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From left, brothers Samuel, 3, Orion, 11, and Felix Lockman, 5, all from Bucks County, watch re-enactor Chuck Lynch (right) demonstrate some of the methods and tools used by Irish immigrants to build the horseshoe curve on Saturday. .

Re-enactor Mark Frederick (right) stands with fellow re-enactor and brother, Jared. The group provided activities for children and used hand tools loaned by the National Park Service to bring to life the work needed to build the curve some 170 years ago. Hard-working Irish immigrants “digged this mountain by hand to build this curve”, said Mark Frederick, adding that it was a “filthy place” for the crew members and their families who worked and lived in the slum nearby. Mirror photo of Cynthia Wise

Katriona Lockman, 9, plays with dominoes given to her by reenactor Michael ‘Mick’ McDonald (right) as her brothers Felix, 5 (left) and Samuel, 3, look on during a protest on Saturday showing how Irish immigrants built the horseshoe curve. Mirror photo of Cynthia Wise

Felix Lockman, 5 (right) and his brother Samuel, 3, play dice during a demonstration on Saturday showing how Irish immigrants lived and worked during the construction of the horseshoe curve. Mirror photo of Cynthia Wise

In honor of Labor Day, re-enactors presented “Altoona at Work – Building the Curve” at the horseshoe curve on Saturday and Sunday. The brothers (left to right) Samuel, 3, Orion, 11 and Felix Lockman, 5, watch pageant Chuck Lynch (right) demonstrate some of the methods and tools used by Irish immigrants to construct the curve horseshoe. The Lockman family traveled from Bucks County for the event, with mum Chrissie noting that Felix is ​​the family’s super rail fan.

Mirror photo of Cynthia Wise



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